The 3 Special (invited) Film Screenings

Film Programme

Tuesday, 22 August 2017
Main Auditorium, Moesgaard Museum:

13.15-15.30: Le Chateau - A portrait of the Muslim Cameroonian Industrialist Al Hajji Mohamadou Ousmanou Abbo
Chaired by Peter I. Crawford (Aarhus University)

Year: 2017, World Premiere. Length: 120 minutes. Director/filmmaker: Lisbet Holtedahl. Editor: Gary Kildea. Production: UiT – The Arctic University of Norway. Country of production: Norway. Country/location of film: Cameroon, Italy, France.

The ambivalent and complicated character of Al Hajji Mohamadou Ousmanou Abbo as well as his “love-hate” relationship with his European partners, help us to grasp aspects of the equally ambivalent and complicated relationship between the rich and the poor and between the Global North and the Global South.

 Through a portrait of this man, Al Hajji Abbo, the film tries to look at the world from the perspective of someone who is rich and powerful, but who also, as the film shows, tends to be vulnerable and misunderstood.

Filmed over a period of more than ten years, the red thread of the story is Al Hajji Abbo's construction of a spectacular château on the outskirts of his native town of Ngaoundéré in Northern Cameroon. The camera follows Al Hajji on various arenas in France, Italy and Cameroon. We learn about his relationships and negotiations with the local population, European artisans, who work on the construction site, his business partners in the country and abroad, as well as local, regional and national authorities and politicians.

Progressively, the viewer discovers that the rich man from the poor country can offer new insights about you and me, about poor and rich countries alike.

Lisbet Holtedahl 

Professor Emerita at UiT - The Arctic University of Norway. She has used pictures and film in all her anthropological research in Eastern Niger, Northern Norway and Northern Cameroon. She has published books and produced 9 ethnographic films about her research on gender, social change, religion, urbanization, politics and power. She is the founding mother of the collaborative inter-university program Ngaoundéré-Anthropos, Cameroon 1992-2006, and the Master program Visual Cultural Studies established at UiT - The Arctic University of Norway in 1997.

 

Tuesday, 22 August 2017
Remisen (Godsbanen, in the city centre)
in co-operation with FoodFilmFestival:

21.15-23.00: Sealers – One Last Hunt.

Chaired by Peter I. Crawford (Aarhus University)

Year: 2017. Length: 98 minutes. Director/filmmaker: Gry Elisabeth Mortensen & Trude Berge Ottersen. Production: Koko Film, Tromsø. Country of production: Norway. Country/location of film: Norway.

Ocean, ice and bitter cold in an untouched corner of the world. A crew who can only trust each other in the kingdom of polar bears and sudden storms.

Until now this has been an annual ritual for the obstinate, ageing skipper, Bjørne, and his first mate, Espen. In the beginning of the 20th century, more than 200 Norwegian sealing vessels were active, now there is only one ship left. But the skipper and his first mate refuse to give in.

With a motley crew of greenhorns and old-timers, they set out on the dangerous journey into the polar ice.

They are the last seal hunters of Norway.

Gry Elisabeth Mortensen and Trude Berge Ottersen

Gry Elisabeth Mortensen grew up on a diet consisting of whale meat and codfish, on a barren island in Arctic Norway. While Trude Berge Ottersen is a domestic southerner from a farming family. Together they are Koko Film, a production company for documentaries, established in 2013 in Tromsø. On set they are teamed up as co-directors, with Gry doing the sound work and Trude operating the camera. They are both educated within anthropological filmmaking, and make films with a relevant and captivating story. Sealers – One Last Hunt is their first feature-length film.

Wednesday, 23 August 2017
Main Auditorium, Moesgaard Museum

Chaired by Peter I. Crawford (Aarhus University)

19.45-21.30: Pelota II

Ocean, ice and bitter cold in an untouched corner of the world. A crew who can only trust each other in the kingdom of polar bears and sudden storms.Year: 2015. Length: 71 minutes. Director/filmmaker: Jørgen Leth & Olatz González Abrisketa. Production: Basque Films, Sunset Productions. Country of production: Basque Country, Spain. Country/location of film: Basque Country. Year: 2015. Length: 71 minutes. Director/filmmaker: Jørgen Leth & Olatz González Abrisketa. Production: Basque Films, Sunset Productions. Country of production: Basque Country, Spain. Country/location of film: Basque Country.

In voice-over, Leth tells us about the production and the special selection procedures of the balls. Before each match, supervisors test the balls – first by bouncing them, to test their elasticity and listen to their sound, then by playing against the wall. Having tested dozens of balls, the finalists finally play twice with two balls.

Leth and González Abrisketa's focus is on the ball at all times – makers, testers, selectors, players and veterans all talk about the ball, not about the rules, winning or losing. Leth also resists the temptation to use footage from his 1983 film Pelota. We stay in the present; the camera shows us that every Basque village has its own authentic frontón (wall), and how the young people are brought up with this exceptional sport.

Olatz González Abrisketa and Jørgen Leth

Olatz González Abrisketa introduce us to the world of the ballgame Basque pelota, a centuries-old sport that is similar to squash.

Jørgen Leth made another film about pelota more than thirty years ago, but he has now returned to the subject to focus in particular on the mysteries of the balls: “Each ball is an individual with its own life.” And every player has his own special relationship with the ball.